What we do

heron at penrose john millar for web

A Heron in the woodlands at Penrose

Helping protect Loe Pool’s unique wildlife and precious habitat, for you
to enjoy,
for nearly 25 years.

 

The Loe Pool Forum works with The National Trust, Natural England, the Environment Agency, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and South West Water to protect the unique Loe Pool surroundings.
We hope to inspire people to care for, and enjoy, this habitat and its wildlife  in a place that has been named an area of Outstanding natural Beauty  – one of only 33 in England – and a Site of Specific Scientific Interest.
This site celebrates the achievements of the Loe Pool Forum in inspiring people to cherish the area’s environmental importance. It also supports the community, students and researchers who are spearheading catchment management.

Why Loe Pool?

Like many lowland lakes in the UK, nutrient levels in the Pool’s water are too high, which caused algal blooms from the 1980s until 2006. This process is known as eutrophication. These algal blooms have a huge impact on the lake’s ecology, including the native plant and trout populations.

pochard by reedbed on loe pool jones for web

Pochard on Loe Pool, Penrose

Loe Pool Forum was set up in 1996 to tackle this problem. Core members of the Forum include the National Trust, Natural England, the Environment Agency and Cornwall Wildlife Trust.

The Cober catchment, encompassing Loe Bar, Loe Pool and the River Cober, is vitally important to the rural economy, community wellbeing, and is the home of unique environmental habitats.

Loe Pool is the largest natural freshwater lake in Cornwall, a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest and is treasured by Helston’s residents and visitors. The River Cober supplies Helston and the Lizard with clean drinking water. And  Loe Bar is nationally significant because of its unusual geomorphology.

Like many of lowland lakes in the UK, nutrient levels in the lake’s water are too high, which caused algal blooms in Loe Pool from the 1980s till 2006. Algal blooms happen when the waters become too rich in nutrients, which is known as eutrophication. These algal blooms have a huge impact on the Pool’s ecology, including the native plant and trout populations, and the clean water supply for local people.

 

logo 3


loe pool aims

how to get there loe pool

To read more about the 2017 Cober Catchment Management Review and 2027 Plan click here.


P1020431

Timothy Walker  is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Geography, Environment and Society, Exeter University runs the Loe Pool Forum.

To get involved contact Tim at t.w.walker@exeter.ac.uk

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